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How to gauge if a company has a good work-life balance

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Alex Bigland culture, Technology, change management...

How to gauge if a company has a good work-life blance

As a change or technology  specialist, you may thrive  off complex issues and strategically overcoming technical problems. But there is more to life than staring at a computer screen all day – if you keep that up without reprieve, you’ll find yourself short-circuiting before long.

You may want a role that is challenging and a role that monetarily rewards your effort and insight, but you should also look for a role that allows for flexibility and values home-life and extra-curricular activities. It’s all about the balance.

Of course, it’s impossible to directly query the reality of a job day-to-day until you get an offer. But you can subtly uncover information about work-life balance. Here’s how:

1. Ask the right questions

There is a way of phrasing this issue that won’t terrify your potential future employer. Couch your queries diplomatically. Ask what the culture is like and why is it unique. Ask what a typical day is like, what benefits the company offers and whether much travel would be involved in the position. You are evaluating what is unsaid as much as what is said in these situations.

2. Look around you at the interview

This is crucial, but it is also something that people often overlook because they are nervous or preoccupied with formulating the correct response to a question. Look around you. Do the people in the office seem happy? Are they talking to one another? If your interview takes place over lunchtime, how many people are just munching a sandwich over their keyboard, and how many people have stepped out for something to eat? The clues are there if you know where to look.

3. Read up on popular research sites

Even a quick scan of the Internet will help you find a number of anonymous reviews and ratings on any given company. Don’t view this information in a vacuum, relate it to any other insights you may have heard elsewhere.

 4. Use your network

Do your research on employees.  Ask around your network to see if they know anyone know currently works at the company or has worked there in the past. Ask your network to put you in touch so that you can discuss their experiences. This will help to paint a picture for you what life is like at the company and and if you see a trend occurring across a number of sampled employees – don’t ignore it.

At Venquis, we pride ourselves on being at the frontier of change management and technology recruitment. Our job board is brimming with exciting opportunities for IT experts. It’s up to you to find the right fit.